• Week 6 & 7 - Bwindow - research and project start

    Par yousra, Liliana, Alex O, Morgan, Amelie, 25/10/15

    "The properties of the thing are always very human, at bottom, reassuring for this very reason. They always relate to what is proper to man, to the properties of man: either they respond to man's needs, and that is precisely their use-value, or else they are the product of a human activity that seems to intend them for those needs." -Jacques Derrida, Specters of Marx

        A study on proportion - seemingly easy, yet riddled with contemporary exceptions and a volition to refute standardized sizes to create a unique, yet oddly impersonal form.

    Library of study photos

    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)

    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)
    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:57:05 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)
    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 17:30:21 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 17:30:21 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 17:30:21 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 18:20:44 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)



    A general study for each element of the Duality project (table, bed, door, window) is summarized here along with a quick proportional study:

        Table: Physically, the table has a variable, yet standardized surface - desks for example vary in between 120x60[cm] and 120x90[cm]. Height ranges from 70[cm] all the way to 150[cm] (standing desks). A comfortable height to accommodate sitting position is around 75[cm]. The table as an object is very simple, a mere 3 to 4 legs, and a flat surface. However the simplicity of such an object should not be disregarded as the table plays a large role in human work and activity. Use of the table has increased drastically in the past few years with the arrival of personal computers. Now, on top of the usual uses of the table (work, eating, holding things), leisure in the form of internet browsing and/or gaming is included. Of course, such activities can also be done on the bed. Motion-wise, the table is very static. It very rarely moves unless the owner is moving house, or if it's a semi-portable table used for certain events. An interesting development would be to design a truly portable table that would be an "accessory" for an individual. Infrastructure-wise, desks tend to be close to electrical sockets to ensure power for lamps, computers, phones, etc.

        Bed:
    Beds share several characteristics with the table in their form: the height is around that of a desk (75[cm]), and the surface is mostly flat. However, the bed takes a form closer to that of man, either standing or lying down. The form of the surface (example: 210[cm]x106.5[cm]) thus shares characteristics with the door, as both have to accommodate a human being in full within said surface. The bed is a piece of furniture used for relaxing: on average it is used for 8 to 10 hours overnight (if you don't study architecture), and can also be used during the day for a quick nap, or just a lie-down. The bed is even more static than the table, as there is no such thing as a portable bed (excluding sleeping bags, and hammocks). A possible infrastructural combination could be between the desk, and the bed, or even the door and the bed.

        Door: As previously stated, the door has a very similar surface to the bed (ex: 210[cm]x94[cm]) but the depth of the door is far smaller than that of any other element (excluding the window) - a mere 9[cm] (average). A door is a passage from one area to another. It can either allow passage or close off the passage (open door/closed door). The differences in the areas can be public/private, private/private, public/public. The time used on average for a door is very minimal, passing through a door takes a second. As stated, the door can be opened and closed, either on a hinge, or on a sliding mechanism, or even on a central axis. The motion of the door can be very interesting. Infrastructurally, the door and window can be combined, in fact, they are almost always combined.

        Window:
    The physical proportions of the window vary drastically (cf photos). The only common characteristic that almost all windows have is that they are not a possible area of passage like the door. (In a specific case window, the window has the same width as the door (92[cm]), but the height is significantly less (79[cm])). Windows still do open up the individual to varied areas, but not for passage. Instead, the window aerates rooms, allows light to enter rooms, and allows the user to see the outside (in some cases not though). The time a window is used exceeds that of the door as aeration can last several hours, and a simple gaze can last minutes. Motion is the same as the door in most cases, though the window has more possibilities of motion. Infrastructurally, as previously stated, the window can be integrated into a door, or be integrated directly into the walls, ceilings in a way that they do not interact directly with other elements.


    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 18:20:44 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 18:20:44 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 18:20:44 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 18:20:44 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)
    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 18:20:44 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)

        So what about combining elements that simply don't seem to be compatible?

    We decided to make a bed with a canopy, the size of a bus stop (to integrate into one of the already made hybrids of Lausanne-Paris). This "bus stop" concept provides shelter from the elements, and the specialized window provides an unobstructed view of the sky. The window is very deep and the external hole is smaller than the internal hole. This is to focus the view in a single, small area. The creation of this new space creates the state of (day)dreaming.

    Iterative design

    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:54:07 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 16:54:07 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 18:49:59 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)

    Scale model (1:20)


    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 09:50:51 GMT+0100 (CET)

    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 09:50:51 GMT+0100 (CET)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 09:50:51 GMT+0100 (CET)

    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 09:50:51 GMT+0100 (CET)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 09:50:51 GMT+0100 (CET)

    Event: bus passing stop (bed)

    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 09:50:51 GMT+0100 (CET)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 09:50:51 GMT+0100 (CET)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 09:50:51 GMT+0100 (CET)

    Construction detail (1:20 & 1:2) + Window detail (1:1)

    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 18:49:59 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)Image Sun Oct 25 2015 18:49:59 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)


  • Measures: Lausanne-Paris

    Par Liliana, Simon, 11/10/15

    Lausanne et Paris ? A première vue cela semble deux villes complètement différentes. Paris, capitale française, ville de la mode. Lausanne, simple ville de Suisse, connue pour ses divers établissements de formations et son hôpital. Mais architecturalement parlant, nous pourrons voir que même si les bâtiments sont différent d'une ville à l'autre, des similitudes peuvent être observées.

    Il a donc été question d'analyser un certain périmètre délimité de l'avenue Georgette à Lausanne et un autre du boulevard Sébastopol à Paris.

    La première étape de ce projet a été de prendre des mesures de notre parcelle à Lausanne, puis de mettre cela sur papier. Nous nous sommes donc équipés d'un double mettre, de quoi prendre des notes et un appareil photo et nous sommes rendus sur place. Mais là où cela a commencé à ce compliquer c'est lorsque qu'il a fallu mesurer des éléments qui n'étaient pas à notre portée, comme la hauteur du bâtiment ou les dimensions des fenêtres du haut, par exemple. C'est pourquoi nous nous sommes aidés de Google maps pour le calcul de la hauteur du bâtiment, puis, par quelques calculs nous avons, par la suite, pu trouver les mesures manquantes.

    Ensuite, nous avons pu faire nos premières expériences avec le dessin, en faisant un monge de notre parcelle avec les mesures recueillies. En dessinant, nous avons pu remarquer à quel point notre façade était géométrique et nous y avons trouvé une unité de mesure qui caractérise le bâtiment. Cependant, cette unité de base ne s'applique pas au haut de la façade, car il faut savoir que cette partie supérieure a été rénovée, ce qui peut expliquer cela. Mais bien évidemment le côté géométrique est maintenu.

    Image Sun Oct 11 2015 21:21:58 GMT+0200 (Europe de l’Ouest (heure d’été))



    Image Sun Oct 11 2015 21:21:58 GMT+0200 (Europe de l’Ouest (heure d’été))




    Image Sun Oct 11 2015 21:21:58 GMT+0200 (Europe de l’Ouest (heure d’été))




    Image Sun Oct 11 2015 21:21:58 GMT+0200 (Europe de l’Ouest (heure d’été))




    Puis, nous nous sommes aidés de l'homme de Vitruve pour montrer l'échelle humaine sur notre dessin et ainsi nous nous sommes également aperçu que l'unité découverte s'intégrait également dans le schéma de l'homme de Vitruve. 

    La deuxième étape, nous a incités à trouver d'autres moyens de mesures, puisque cette fois nous devions travailler avec un site "virtuel", Paris. Ainsi, nous nous sommes appuyés sur Google maps et Google earth, en mesurant proportionnellement aux personnes présentes sur les images que nous avions a dispositions.

    Cette fois-ci, l'approche du dessin fût plus simple puisque ce n'était pas la première fois, mais même si nous avons quand mêmeune symétrie clairement remarquable sur notre parcelle parisienne, les détails étaient beaucoup plus présents et moins "rectangulaires" qu'à Lausanne.

    Image Sun Oct 11 2015 21:21:58 GMT+0200 (Europe de l’Ouest (heure d’été))



    Etant donné que nous avions un parque, nous avons trouvé intéressant de dessiner tout d'abord ce qui a été construit par l'homme, puis de rajouter à l'aide de calques la végétation, puis l'échelle humaine, afin de pouvoir observé distinctement chaque étape. Puis, nous avons également fait un calque qui représente une fosse commune, pour ajouter une petite touche historique du site.

    Avec tout ceci, nous devions maintenant décider d'un premier moule. Après quelques observations et réflexions, nous avons décidé de mouler la façade de notre bâtiment lausannois. En fait, nous avons remarqué que les deux parties de la façade, ne se différenciaient non pas seulement par leur aspect ou dû aux rénovations, mais parce que a partie inférieures était d'un domaine plutôt publique, avec des commerces, et la partie supérieure plutôt privée, avec des bureaux. Ainsi, nous avons utilisé l'unité de mesure pour démontrer cela, en mettant beaucoup de carrés sur la partie publique et moins, voire aucun sur la partie privé.

    Image Sun Oct 11 2015 21:21:58 GMT+0200 (Europe de l’Ouest (heure d’été))



    Finalement, la troisième étape a été de confronter Lausanne et Paris. Nous avons donc décidé de faire un hybride de nos deux parcelles, car nous avons pu observer que notre unité de mesure s'intégrait également à Paris ! Ainsi, nous avons combiné le parque de Paris et le bâtiment de Lausanne avec la récurrence de l'unité de mesure qui symbolise la hiérarchie de la propriété. A l'intérieur du parque nous avons un sol rempli de détails, donc de carrés, car nous sommes dans un parque qui est totalement publique. Puis à la sortie de celui-ci les détails commencent à s'effacer par récurrence et nous arrivons dans la partie inférieure du bâtiments, qui est semi-publique. Cette dernière possède encore des détails, mais moins que le parque. Et ainsi, la partie supérieur de l'édifice n'a plus que quelques carrés, mais en grande partie "vide", puisque nous sommes dans le domaine privé. Ensuite, nous avons décidé de faire une pente à notre hybride, tout d'abord pour montrer la dénivellation entre Lausanne et Paris, mais surtout pour accentuer ce dégradé de détails, plus cela monte, moins il y a de détails.

    Image Sun Oct 11 2015 21:21:58 GMT+0200 (Europe de l’Ouest (heure d’été))



    Image Sun Oct 11 2015 21:21:58 GMT+0200 (Europe de l’Ouest (heure d’été))




    Enfin, nous avons dessiné des perspectives, afin de voir le résultat sous divers angles.


    Image Sun Oct 11 2015 21:21:58 GMT+0200 (Europe de l’Ouest (heure d’été))



    Image Sun Oct 11 2015 21:21:58 GMT+0200 (Europe de l’Ouest (heure d’été))