• III.PLANES

    Par yousra, 03/01/16

    First week...

    During this week , I've analyzed all the parcels of the hybrid site that both Studio Durr and Studio Delgrosso have created for the first project (Measures). During my analysis, I've noticed that in every single hybrid, there is a striking distinction between two different spaces. I have also noticed that these two spaces were mainly interior spaces. In one side Lausanne and Paris on the other.The question that raised was : Is it possible to connect these two spaces? If it is possible, than how? Afterwards, we had to draw our  double element-which was a redesign of a bus stop- twenty five times on the map of our hybrid space to see how it affects the movement. This study made me realize that it actually blocks the movement and creates a sort of obstacle in the course of a person. 

     Second week...

    This week, my main worry was to understand these two spaces and answering to my  previous questions.After multiple reflections, I have decided to create a transition area between these two interior  spaces(one in Paris and the other in Lausanne). Unlike the double element, which was mainly based on the concept of a bus stop, I have chosen to break this discontinuity by creating a fluid space that connects these spaces.I was inspired by several pictures on Pinterest.

    Here are some examples :

      Image Sun Jan 03 2016 12:04:14 GMT+0100 (CET) Image Sun Jan 03 2016 12:04:14 GMT+0100 (CET) Image Sun Jan 03 2016 12:04:14 GMT+0100 (CET) Image Sun Jan 03 2016 12:04:14 GMT+0100 (CET)

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     Third week ...

    My ideas began to take shape through drawings and mock-ups. I imagined a scenario of two persons: one in Lausanne and the other one in Paris. These two persons live in a building and they want to meet. However, none of these two persons want to move to the other city. Therefore, they have decided to make an arrangement: to meet in-between the two cities. Here came the idea of creating a gathering area between these two spaces. So the passage in fact leads to a sort of interspace . Afterwards, I asked myself the following question: Can the person meet  another person from another floor ? That's how I had the idea of creating relationships between all the floors of both buildings, not only that, but also between a building itself. Like an interlace...


    Image Sun Jan 03 2016 12:04:14 GMT+0100 (CET)  Image Sun Jan 03 2016 12:04:14 GMT+0100 (CET)

     Braiding concept


    Fourth week...

                                                            


                                                                            I N T E R L A C  E




                      INTERLACE

                            Passages...


                      INTERLACE

                             Spaces...

                      What's in the other side ?                                                                      

                      Lausanne & Paris united

                              Gathering space ...

                           Interconnections

                      Hello from the other side


                                          

        












  • Week 9 - Finalisation of Double Element - Bwindow

    Par yousra, Liliana, Amelie, Morgan, Alex O, 08/11/15

    Our double element was formed around a very specific concept: “look up!”. In cities, the average person looks straight – rarely up. This is due to the design of "said" cities. We decided to take advantage of a “public break”, the act of waiting for the bus, to make the user look up.

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  • Week 8 - Several Modifications

    Par yousra, Liliana, Amelie, Morgan, Alex O, 01/11/15

    Changes, modifications, and more changes.


    Starting off with making the structure lighter:

    We have decided to drastically reduce the amount of wood used in the building process. The main issue was the bottom of the bed. Previously, it was a block of wood strapped together to form a generic rectangle. This was obviously not a possibility, therefore we have designed a new supporting structure which consists of 4 identical feet: these feet are similar in structural design to a small metallic roof of a bus stop. A full size, usable test was built to confirm its structural soundness. Using it like a chair did not cause any damage, in fact, the compression made the joints even stronger and ensured no lateral slipping. The feet will alternate on the structure to ensure a certain symmetry. It should be also noted that no glue, screws, or any other bonding agent was used.

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    The base of the bed - 1:1 test

    Finally, we have also decided to buy flat wood surfaces to cover the large areas of the element.


    Now on to the newly implemented mechanism to ensure interesting movement within our element:
    Instead of a transformation, we decided to "force" our concept upon the user - no matter which position you angle the headrest, the window will always be above you in an optimal fashion (the external surface of the window stays parallel to the inclined surface of the bed). By doing this, we want to ensure that the user will look up through the window at the blank sky.

    An extra system was designed in Topsolid to block the side views of the user:

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    Elevation - Red surface represents the system that blocks the view

    Essentially the bottom three sides of a hexagon:

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    Plan of element

    Of course, this movement was drawn in three positions overlaid in the form of a plan, elevation, and frontal elevation.

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    Element movement in 1:10 scale

    Construction details were also done to review the feasability on paper instead of on a computer:

    [INSERT IMAGE]


    INFRASTRUCTURE:

    As previously stated, our element is supposed to replace one of the bus stops within the collection of hybrids.

    Within this collection, there are two bus stops. We decided to overlay them in a somewhat unorthodox manner. The plans were drawn in an axonometry with just the area of interest (the bus stops) extruded from these plans. The goal was a comparitive analysis of these two seperate areas based on the bus stops.

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    It should be noted that the hybrids do not actually conform to the actual size of the bus stop as seen on the large plan elevation of plot number 17 (they are bigger to ensure visibilty and importance of the program that is public transport).

    Image Sun Nov 01 2015 20:15:38 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)


  • Week 7 - Infrastructure group

    Par yousra, Paulo, Maude, Alexandre, Enea, Liliana, Allae Elfarrah, Tom, Florence, Simon, fanny, Nicolas, Maria, Christian, Amelie, Morgan, Mathilde, Romain, Jonathan, Dana, Alex O, 25/10/15


    All plans aligned (note: diagonal lines added but not present in image)

    Image Sun Oct 25 2015 19:55:08 GMT+0100 (W. Europe Standard Time)








  • Week 6 & 7 - Bwindow - research and project start

    Par yousra, Liliana, Alex O, Morgan, Amelie, 25/10/15

    "The properties of the thing are always very human, at bottom, reassuring for this very reason. They always relate to what is proper to man, to the properties of man: either they respond to man's needs, and that is precisely their use-value, or else they are the product of a human activity that seems to intend them for those needs." -Jacques Derrida, Specters of Marx

        A study on proportion - seemingly easy, yet riddled with contemporary exceptions and a volition to refute standardized sizes to create a unique, yet oddly impersonal form.

    Library of study photos

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    A general study for each element of the Duality project (table, bed, door, window) is summarized here along with a quick proportional study:

        Table: Physically, the table has a variable, yet standardized surface - desks for example vary in between 120x60[cm] and 120x90[cm]. Height ranges from 70[cm] all the way to 150[cm] (standing desks). A comfortable height to accommodate sitting position is around 75[cm]. The table as an object is very simple, a mere 3 to 4 legs, and a flat surface. However the simplicity of such an object should not be disregarded as the table plays a large role in human work and activity. Use of the table has increased drastically in the past few years with the arrival of personal computers. Now, on top of the usual uses of the table (work, eating, holding things), leisure in the form of internet browsing and/or gaming is included. Of course, such activities can also be done on the bed. Motion-wise, the table is very static. It very rarely moves unless the owner is moving house, or if it's a semi-portable table used for certain events. An interesting development would be to design a truly portable table that would be an "accessory" for an individual. Infrastructure-wise, desks tend to be close to electrical sockets to ensure power for lamps, computers, phones, etc.

        Bed:
    Beds share several characteristics with the table in their form: the height is around that of a desk (75[cm]), and the surface is mostly flat. However, the bed takes a form closer to that of man, either standing or lying down. The form of the surface (example: 210[cm]x106.5[cm]) thus shares characteristics with the door, as both have to accommodate a human being in full within said surface. The bed is a piece of furniture used for relaxing: on average it is used for 8 to 10 hours overnight (if you don't study architecture), and can also be used during the day for a quick nap, or just a lie-down. The bed is even more static than the table, as there is no such thing as a portable bed (excluding sleeping bags, and hammocks). A possible infrastructural combination could be between the desk, and the bed, or even the door and the bed.

        Door: As previously stated, the door has a very similar surface to the bed (ex: 210[cm]x94[cm]) but the depth of the door is far smaller than that of any other element (excluding the window) - a mere 9[cm] (average). A door is a passage from one area to another. It can either allow passage or close off the passage (open door/closed door). The differences in the areas can be public/private, private/private, public/public. The time used on average for a door is very minimal, passing through a door takes a second. As stated, the door can be opened and closed, either on a hinge, or on a sliding mechanism, or even on a central axis. The motion of the door can be very interesting. Infrastructurally, the door and window can be combined, in fact, they are almost always combined.

        Window:
    The physical proportions of the window vary drastically (cf photos). The only common characteristic that almost all windows have is that they are not a possible area of passage like the door. (In a specific case window, the window has the same width as the door (92[cm]), but the height is significantly less (79[cm])). Windows still do open up the individual to varied areas, but not for passage. Instead, the window aerates rooms, allows light to enter rooms, and allows the user to see the outside (in some cases not though). The time a window is used exceeds that of the door as aeration can last several hours, and a simple gaze can last minutes. Motion is the same as the door in most cases, though the window has more possibilities of motion. Infrastructurally, as previously stated, the window can be integrated into a door, or be integrated directly into the walls, ceilings in a way that they do not interact directly with other elements.


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        So what about combining elements that simply don't seem to be compatible?

    We decided to make a bed with a canopy, the size of a bus stop (to integrate into one of the already made hybrids of Lausanne-Paris). This "bus stop" concept provides shelter from the elements, and the specialized window provides an unobstructed view of the sky. The window is very deep and the external hole is smaller than the internal hole. This is to focus the view in a single, small area. The creation of this new space creates the state of (day)dreaming.

    Iterative design

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    Scale model (1:20)


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    Event: bus passing stop (bed)

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    Construction detail (1:20 & 1:2) + Window detail (1:1)

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