• In Between

    Par Hausel Anna, 01/03/20

    Observations

    There is something remarkable about human behavior in new spaces. Our first visit to the Mangrove site in December can be viewed as a spacial expriment : how does someone adapt to novel environments. Following two groups of students - first only my studio then the whole year - I decided to document how bodies would react and inhabit the space instinctively. 

    I observed two common actions : curiosity (or most interestingly the repetitive attempt of climbing onto the small wall in the river) and a want to sit or lay down. 

    Therefore I took a specific interest in those who sat on the wall. I believe they seeked a safe space out of the way.


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    A Safe Space

    I cannot speak of merely a human condition in the necessity of a safe space, as my experience indicates all creatures need one. Height or warmth, or bare plains or hiding in busy landscapes. Every creature differs.

    A bird perches high in the tree to observe its surroundings. A student climbs over and under trunks to rest undisturbed on the other side of water. Difficulty of access amplifies our sensation of security. A child sets up her toys in the staircase central to her house from where she can hear or see all residents of her household; it is no longer a passing space filled with being neither here nor there; it is visibility and escape routes and a place to rest.

    The hearth is the symbol of home, but stairs are - for me - the safe space, a place of memories and of comfort. It is young legs stretching to take two steps a time. It is a dream when growing up in flats. It is checking parents are still there late at night. It is running up three stories at the end of a long day, finally in the warm grasp of home. 


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    A toy house observed from the stairwell. A given reference.


    Motion / Stagnation

    Wishing to imitate the protected “in between”ness I sense in both stairs and in the site, I wanted to create an ascending room in the top of the protostructure, lifting off the path descending towards the riverside. Starting narrow, the room filters person per person entering, but expands gradually. There are two horizontal branches of the protostructure - the first at 60cm from the ground and the second the second 130cm - that create obstacles, one to duck under and one to step over, like on the wall on the other side of the protostructure. At the end of the stairs is a platform turning to a slope onto which a body can lean.



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    Claude Parent, sketch for apartment, 1971, France.


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    A mock-up of the maquette. My project: left, Cyril’s project: right. 1:20


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    The development of the model.



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    Maquette 1:10


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    Rhino drawings

  • Scaffolding

    Par Dürig Alexander, Hausel Anna, 18/12/19

    Vertical and horizontal : touching.

    We started off planes questioning how two planes interact. They either create a joint or they merely touch. Following our ideas from planes, we decided to continue with the idea of the two planes touching, not creating a new three dimensional junction, but a two dimensional limit. For this, we experimented with various materials to see how they would join. 



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    The plan was to use the protostructure to orient a vertical and horizontal plane, the vertical meeting the ground. For this, we started studying the topography of our space. During this research, we realised that our ground is very rich and itself orients multiple planes. The two such planes that most interested us were the planes extending from two intersections of the three main topographical elements. These two planes intersect in a unique line, that itself has a unique vertical plane traversing it. Using this plane, we could translate upward the topography; the plane elevating the ground.


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    To show the interior of the intersection, we chose to cut the two planes. Indecisive of the final material, we started to map out the planes with cardboard. 


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    Elevated on our (implied) vertical plane, we can find our topography suspended from the same height proportionally to the higher traversal parts of the protostructure to that of the lower ones.


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    Finally we chose white cardboard reinforced by a wooden frame.


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  • SYNTHESIS PLANES

    Par Hausel Anna, Deshayes Charlotte, Dürig Alexander, Sills Sophie, 24/11/19

    The meeting of a horizontal and a vertical plane. The Rolex Learning Center. A reference to Measures.


    A common denominator: Levitation.


    Taken by the way the Rolex Center seemed to rise up and separate from the ground, we began to study this acclivity of the building. After a week of brainstorming and modelling potentials, we found a few integral elements to the project, as well as a coherent form for our project to take. 

    Firstly, a curved plane that follows the initial curve of the Rolex above head height. This plane is suspended from a second, vertical, plane. This vertical plane is formed by columns of the same, or similar, composition to those of last year's Houses project. Finally, a structural horizontal plane that supports the vertical and hold the cables. The length of this must be at least two paces long to encourage movement.


    A new axis: Movement.


    More people walk alongside the building than towards it, at least during our alignment to the beginning of the curve. 

    Stepping up onto the raised platform, we enter the interior of the project. The curve rises, opening the space under it, the curve of the base also curves outward. Two paces, and a oblique curve dangling above. The juncture of the vertical and the horizontal uncertain, merely touching, unattached. There is no new space created by it. The joint is simply a perimeter of the extent of the interior, the two-dimensional limit separating in from out.


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  • Suspending an Acclivity

    Par Deshayes Charlotte, Dürig Alexander, Hausel Anna, Sills Sophie, 19/11/19

    The meeting of a horizontal and a vertical plane. The Rolex Learning Center. A reference to Measures.

    A common denominator: Levitation.


    Image Sat Nov 30 2019 14:12:26 GMT+0100 (CET)


    Taken by the way the Rolex Center seemed to rise up and separate from the ground, we began to study this acclivity.


    Image Sat Nov 30 2019 14:12:26 GMT+0100 (CET)

    After modelling potentials, we found a few integral elements to the project, as well as a coherent form for our project to take. 


    The "integral elements":

    • A curved plane that follows the initial curve of the Rolex above head height.
    • This plane is suspended from the vertical plane.
    • The vertical plane is formed by columns of the same, or similar, composition to those of last year's Houses project.
    • A structural horizontal plane that supports the vertical and hold the cables.
    • The length of this must be at least two paces to encourage movement.


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    The "coherent form":


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    The model on site:


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    A new axis: Movement.


    More people walk alongside the building than towards it, at least during our alignment to the beginning of the curve. 

    Stepping up onto the raised platform, we enter the interior of the project. The curved plane rises, opening the space under it, the curve of the base also curves outward. Two paces, and a oblique curve dangling above. The juncture of the vertical and the horizontal uncertain, merely touching, unattached. There is no new space created by it. The joint is simply a perimeter of the extent of the interior, the two-dimensional limit separating in from out.


    Image Tue Nov 26 2019 12:06:59 GMT+0100 (CET)


    Having calculated we would need 80m of wood to complete this project in real size, we decided to alter it somewhat. First of all, we simplified the base, removing the solid layer of wood, just keeping the framework that stabilises the pillars. We also chose to add a system of supporting joints to keep them upright. The mass of the original base having been the stabilising element of the structure, we realised that balance needed to be reinstalled. So we duplicated our hovering plane, the two twin planes framing the Rolex's acclivity. This opened up a new door to our project, adding a new aspect of movement, a tension between the hanging planes and strengthening the relationship with the RLC.


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    We also decided to reduce the size of the pillars by 0.5m. This length is also the difference between the heights of the two suspended planes. On site, originally, the "curves" would aline with the Rolex behind it. 

    Additionally we experimented with the materiality and the shape of the curved planes by making 1:10 models in plaster.


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    The final construction:


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    The project overall reminds us of the for of Joel Shapiro's Almine Rech exhibition:


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    https://dailyartfair.com [Oct 09 - Nov 12, 2014]


    The sentence that was most often spoken:

    "But, how will that hold?"


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  • Digging up the Future

    Par Hausel Anna, Ozhiganova Anna, Sills Sophie, 15/10/19

    On Site


    TUESDAY MORNING

    We took the boat at 7:40 to get to Evian to have the time to take our measures.

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    The sunrise and the protostructure.


    We discovered the protostructure and last year's node.

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    The nodes and the visible foundations.


    Our measuring tools : body part: Sophie's foot, object from surrounding: chestnut, verb: to pull.

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    The chestnut and Sophie's foot next to the visible foundation.


    Our last measuring tool: time. We measured this by when one of us started hurting.

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    Our performance sentences along with the moments they mark.


    We dug a hole around the foundations to explore how it was made.

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    The before and after of the digging of the foundation, with our tool of measurement.


    SUNDAY MORNING

    After a small sprint to get to the boat at 9:25 (not at 9:45 like Anna H. remembered) we embarked on the journey to discover the effect the rainy weather had had on our on-site plaster cast.

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    The cast.


    To move the plaster we had to make the choice of cutting off a corner.

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    Various pieces of plaster.


    The full process of plastering the foundations can be summarised by five verbs: mixing, applying, drying, scraping and pulling.

    Video of the stages of casting.


    We were diversely affected by the process.

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    Sophie's hands and Anna H.'s legs.

    The process had various effects on our senses

    Anna H.: smell_wet grass, touch_smooth mud and dry dirt, taste_bitter dirt covered concrete, sight_raindrops on my camera, sound_the ping of raindrops on my umbrella.

    Anna O.: smell_humidity, touch_tiring, sight_messy, sound_foggy, taste_adventure.

    Sophie S.:smell_ fresh, touch_new, taste_raw, sight_dramatic , sound_drops.


    We found the Great Mosque of Djenne that reminds us of the project.

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    The Great Mosque, Djenne, Mali, 1907


    The whole process made us reflect upon measures as a project:

    Are we digging up the past, the present or the future?


    In Studio


    CODEX AND CONCEPT

    “When Lewis Carroll started to write, he sent his protagonist down to the rabbit-hole without any plan for what would happen thereafter. While writing he constantly added new ideas, “which seems to grow of themselves upon the original stock”.” -Codex Measures: Postface (p.65-66)


    Future and past intertwining; the old sprouting the new, yet also the new redefining the old. Digging up the past, but also the present and the future. Casting the interstice from above; instead of looking at the present - the newly dug ground - we are looking at the past: cement touching wood. Nevertheless the space above the (w)hole is the future, measuring the end of the natural progression of filling it up. Unlike for Carroll, the end of the story is known, but the beginning is still to be discovered. A complex hybrid of a geometrically constructed polyhedron of the interstice in contrast with the organic can emerge. An onsite cast, which seems to  “grow of [itself] upon the original stock” - in this case, onto a clean studio plaster cast, - yet it is the inverse: the rest of the plaster growing downward from the weathered material. Future and past interlaced, placed upon present.


    PLASTER CASTING THE (W)HOLE

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    Making of the first plaster.


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    The result.


    PLASTER CASTING THE HYBRID

    I. Understanding the onsite plaster

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    Mapping the plaster.


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    The plaster, mapped (Axonometry by Anna H., Monge and Coupes by Sophie).


    II. Securing the connection

    The idea to support the organic plaster within the mold was to drill into it and add metal bars.

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    Brainstorming.


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    The hybrid mold.


    III. Recasting

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    The process of the plaster drying was visible to the naked eye.


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    The hybrid.


    LETTING TIME TAKE ITS TOLL (a scenario of destruction)

    Time passes. It will take everything, eventually. It will act upon the Proto-Structure.

    Rot, mould, insects and humidity infest wood, rust corrodes screws. The weight of the structure itself will become too heavy and start to break and fall, the pull of gravity being too strong. Animals will repossess the space, reappropriating the project. By the end of times it will be only splinters and decomposition. The only remaining part will be the underground ciment foundations, keeping its rock-like composition. 

    Maybe future archeologists will dig them up and make theories of our primitive society.

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    https://pxhere.com/en/photo/1153297


    How does the future define our present and past?